Web Forms, ASP.NET MVC, and ASP.NET Web Pages

ASP.NET offers three frameworks for creating web applications: Web Forms, ASP.NET MVC, and ASP.NET Web Pages. All three frameworks are stable and mature, and you can create great web applications with any of them. No matter what framework you choose, you will get all the benefits and features of ASP.NET everywhere.

Each framework targets a different development style. The one you choose depends on a combination of your programming assets (knowledge, skills, and development experience), the type of application you’re creating, and the development approach you’re comfortable with.

Below is an overview of each of the frameworks and some ideas for how to choose between them.

If you have experience in Development style Expertise
Web Forms Win Forms, WPF, .NET Rapid development using a rich library of controls that encapsulate HTML markup Mid-Level, Advanced RAD
MVC Ruby on Rails, .NET Full control over HTML markup, code and markup separated, and easy to write tests. The best choice for mobile and single-page applications (SPA). Mid-Level, Advanced
Web Pages Classic ASP, PHP HTML markup and your code together in the same file New, Mid-Level

Web Forms

With ASP.NET Web Forms, you can build dynamic websites using a familiar drag-and-drop, event-driven model. A design surface and hundreds of controls and components let you rapidly build sophisticated, powerful UI-driven sites with data access.

MVC

ASP.NET MVC gives you a powerful, patterns-based way to build dynamic websites that enables a clean separation of concerns and that gives you full control over markup for enjoyable, agile development. ASP.NET MVC includes many features that enable fast, TDD-friendly development for creating sophisticated applications that use the latest web standards.1

ASP.NET Web Pages

ASP.NET Web Pages and the Razor syntax provide a fast, approachable, and lightweight way to combine server code with HTML to create dynamic web content. Connect to databases, add video, link to social networking sites, and include many more features that help you create beautiful sites that conform to the latest web standards.

Notes about Web Forms, MVC, and Web Pages

All three ASP.NET frameworks are based on the .NET Framework and share core functionality of .NET and of ASP.NET. For example, all three frameworks offer a login security model based around membership, and all three share the same facilities for managing requests, handling sessions, and so on that are part of the core ASP.NET functionality.

In addition, the three frameworks are not entirely independent, and choosing one does not preclude using another. Since the frameworks can coexist in the same web application, it’s not uncommon to see individual components of applications written using different frameworks. For example, customer-facing portions of an app might be developed in MVC to optimize the markup, while the data access and administrative portions are developed in Web Forms to take advantage of data controls and simple data access.

Web Forms, ASP.NET MVC, and ASP.NET Web Pages

WHAT IS A WEBHOOK?

The concept of a WebHook is simple. A WebHook is an HTTP callback: an HTTP POST that occurs when something happens; a simple event-notification via HTTP POST.

A web application implementing WebHooks will POST a message to a URL when certain things happen. When a web application enables users to register their own URLs, the users can then extend, customize, and integrate that application with their own custom extensions or even with other applications around the web. For the user, WebHooks are a way to receive valuable information when it happens, rather than continually polling for that data and receiving nothing valuable most of the time. WebHooks have enormous potential and are limited only by your imagination! (No, it can’t wash the dishes. Yet.)

WebHooks are meant to do something. To get your imagination spinning with your own ideas, here are the three general ways in which WebHooks can be used to make your web more programmable:

Push: receiving data in real time

Push is the simplest of reasons to use WebHooks. As was just stated above, no more polling every couple of minutes to find out if there is new information. Just register a WebHook and receive the data at your doorstep as soon as it exists. It’s less work, less hassle, and you’ll probably even receive it sooner than if you were asking for it every couple of minutes.

Pipes: receiving data and passing it on

A Pipe happens when your WebHook not only receives real-time data, but goes on to do something new and meaningful with it, triggering actions unrelated to the original event. For example, you create a script, register its URL at a photo site, and have it email you when your mother posts a new photo. Or make a script that creates a Twitter message, and have it triggered by a WebHook whenever you add a new product on your commerce website.

Plugins: processing data and giving something in return

This is where the entire web becomes a programming platform. You can use this form of WebHooks to allow others to extend your application. Facebook’s Application Platform uses WebHooks in this way, and so does Google Wave’s robot integration. The general idea is that a web application sending out data via WebHooks will also use the response to modify its own data. At Facebook, when you access an app, Facebook sends a WebHook out to your application saying “Hey, someone’s accessing your application, what do I do?!” The application responds with, “Show the user this page…” Facebook does so, and the pattern continues in the same manner as you continue to use the application. At Google Wave, when you do something in a wave, any robot you’ve added as a participant is notified via a WebHook, and the robot has the ability to modify the wave in its http response. Implement WebHooks in this way in your application if you want to allow others to truly extend and enhance the abilities of your application.

How do they work?

By letting the user specify a URL for various events, the application will POST data to those URLs when the events occur. With the cheap availability of PHP hosting and even easier simple app/script hosting like AppJet or Scriptlets, handling the POST data becomes fairly trivial. How you use it is up to you and whatever you want to accomplish. Among other things, you can:

  • create notifications to you or anybody via email, IRC, Jabber, …
  • put the data in another app (real-time data synchronization)
  • process the data and repost it using the app’s API
  • validate the data and potentially prevent it from being used by the app

Why should I care?

As integrated as we perceive the web, most web applications today operate in silos. With the rise of API’s we’ve seen mashups and some degree of integration between applications. However, we have not seen the vision of the programmable web: a web where you as the user can “pipe” data between apps much like the Unix command line. Some say RSS is the answer. They are wrong. The heart is in the right place, but the implementation is wrong. RSS is still useful, but it is not going to bring us the true programmable web.

We just need a simple way to get data out in real-time to let the user easily do whatever they want with it. That means no polling, no content constraints, and no XML parsing. That means no RSS. Using HTTP is simpler and easier to use. PHP is a very popular and accessible programming environment, so it’s likely to be used often for writing hooklets… getting data from a web POST in PHP is as simple as $_POST[‘something’]. And making the request to the user script is as simple as making an HTTP request, something already built-in to most programming environments. In fact, web hooks are easier to implement than an API.

However implemented (although the easier the more likely it will be adopted), having an output for the web will complement the input provided by the rising adoption of API’s. When you have both input and output, you have everything you need for apps to easily interact. This will encourage smaller, more focused apps that together with hook-enabled heavier apps will let amazing emergent creations happen!

How do I implement WebHooks?

Simply provide your users with the ability to submit their own URL, and POST to that URL when something happens. It’s that simple. There are no specs you have to follow.

WHAT IS A WEBHOOK?

Singleton Design Pattern

Singleton pattern is one of the simplest design patterns. This type of design pattern comes under creational pattern as this pattern provides one of the ways to create an object.

This pattern involves a single class which is responsible to create an object while making sure that only single object gets created. This class provides a way to access its only object which can be accessed directly without need to instantiate the object of the class.

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Singleton Design Pattern

Abstract Factory Design Pattern

Abstract Factory patterns work around a super-factory which creates other factories. This factory is also called as factory of factories. This type of design pattern comes under creational pattern as this pattern provides one of the best ways to create an object.

In Abstract Factory pattern an interface is responsible for creating a factory of related objects without explicitly specifying their classes. Each generated factory can give the objects as per the Factory pattern.

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Abstract Factory Design Pattern

Factory Design Pattern

Factory pattern is one of most used design pattern. This type of design pattern comes under creational pattern as this pattern provides one of the best ways to create an object.

In Factory pattern, we create object without exposing the creation logic to the client and refer to newly created object using a common interface.

Implementation

We’re going to create a IShape interface and concrete classes implementing the Shape interface. A factory class ShapeFactory is defined as a next step.

FactoryPatternDemo, our demo class will use ShapeFactory to get a Shapeobject. It will pass information (CIRCLE / RECTANGLE / SQUARE) toShapeFactory to get the type of object it needs.

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Factory Design Pattern

What is Micro Services?

Microservices is an architectural style in which complex applications are composed of small, independent processes communicating with each other using language-agnostic APIs. “A micro service is an isolated, loosely-coupled unit that works on a single concern.”

Every micro service in a system :-

  • Runs in its own separate process.
  • Can be deployed on its own, independently of the other micro services.
  • Has its own dedicated data store.
  • Collaborates with other micro services to complete its own action.
Note: A micro service does not need to be written in the same programming  language  (C#,  Java etc.)  or  for  the  same  platform  (IIS,  Apache) as one it collaborates with.

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What is Micro Services?